Archive for the ‘Session Proposals’ Category

  • Break These Values: Game Your Discipline (A Talk and Make Session)

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    At THATCamp CHNM 2012, Mills Kelly led a session on “Pedagogies of Disruption” that outlined ways of teaching humanities knowledge by disrupting values: turning what a field cares about on its head in order to teach it (see the linked GoogleDoc for some fantastic assignment ideas and example values). Let’s hold a session that puts a gamic twist on disrupting values to learn and teach: » Read the rest of the entry..

  • Session Request: Mod Videogames for Great Knowledge!

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    Screengrab of poster from Fallout 3 videogame showing "Pip Boy" mascot and the words "prepare for the future"
    If another attendee or two has experience using mod tools to create a video game version/segment with a DH flavor (e.g. making an argument, use within the classroom), perhaps they could co-facilitate a talk session about existing mods to check out, values/lessons/arguments begging to be modded into specific games, and the technical considerations behind modding games DH-style (e.g. recommended tutorials or games with well-documented mod systems).

    I’ve started to work on a Fallout 3 mod with two aims: magnify and augment the game’s message about textual and archival memories, and create something encapsulated enough that it can be jumped into by players who haven’t played Fallout, FPSs, or don’t consider themselves gamers (e.g. likely some of the students in a humanities undergrad classroom). It would be interesting to hear from others about modding aspirations and challengesPicture of Fallout 3 Pip Boy, as this is my first experience.
    (If you’re specifically interested in Fallout 3 as a great game for modding, check out Trevor Owen’s Play the Past piece arguing for the game as the “World’s Best History/Archeology Sim” and substantiating the claim that “despite having no history in it, Fallout 3 is the world best history game”.

  • Session Proposal: What Needs to be in a Pedagogical Game?

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    So, I have a game I’ve just finished called A Tragedy in Five Acts, which focuses on the formula of Shakespeare’s tragedies and recreating that through a play experience. I’d like to release a version that’s more specifically geared toward pedagogy, but one of the questions I’m running into is, “what would go into a pedagogical version? Is it even necessary?” I’d like to talk about the difference (if any) between a game intended for entertainment and a game intended for teaching, whether or not there’s anything useful in creating that difference, and what sorts of things that difference might entail.

  • Session Proposals

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    portal-poster

    It’s time to get ready for THATCamp Games 2013! If you haven’t made your travel plans, we have some suggestions on our travel page. You can also use Twitter or the Teamwork Forum to find potential room or ride shares.

    But remember, this isn’t a traditional conference, and there’s no need to prepare a paper or presentation. Instead, use this blog to propose a session around ideas in technology, humanities and games that you’d like to share, discuss, debate, hack and build during the course of our weekend. There are great suggestions for proposing sessions on the THATCamp main site and at the Original THATCamp Games site (Pages 1 through 5).

    Feel free to get started now! If you are a participant, you should have your account information in your email–-check your spam folder or email us if you have any concerns. And, PLEASE, don’t forget to fill out the questionnaire, as we need your t-shirt size and attendance plans!

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